Vocation Wisdom From The Truth and Meaning of Human Sexuality

Sabiduría Vocacional: Verdad y Significado de la Sexualidad Humana

Catholic Family 3

Excerpts From The Truth and Meaning of Human Sexuality, The Pontifical Council for the Family, 1995

Note: This marvelous document from the Pontifical Council for the Family is a rich source of insight and advice to parents concerning chastity education for children; however, the document also contains many beautiful truths about marriage, family, parenting, vocation promotion, and human love. The excerpts below are mostly related to parents’ duties to provide vocational guidance to their children. The full document can be found here.

—–

5. In the framework of educating the young person for self-realization and self-giving, formation for chastity implies the collaboration first and foremost of the parents, as is the case with formation for the other virtues such as temperance, fortitude and prudence. Chastity cannot exist as a virtue without the capacity to renounce self, to make sacrifices and to wait. In giving life, parents cooperate with the creative power of God and receive the gift of a new responsibility — not only to feed their children and satisfy their material and cultural needs, but above all to pass on to them the lived truth of the faith and to educate them in love of God and neighbor. This is the parents’ first duty in the heart of the “domestic church.” The Church has always affirmed that parents have the duty and the right to be the first and the principal educators of their children. Taking up the teaching of the Second Vatican Council, the Catechism of the Catholic Church says, “It is imperative to give suitable and timely instruction to young people, above all in the heart of their own families, about the dignity of married love, its role, and its exercise.”

—–

6. The challenges raised today by the mentality and social environment should not discourage parents. In fact it is worth recalling that Christians have had to face up to similar challenges of materialistic hedonism from the time of the first evangelization. Moreover…

“…This kind of critical reflection should lead our society, which certainly contains many positive aspects on the material and cultural level, to realize that, from various points of view, it is a society which is sick and is creating profound distortions in man. Why is this happening? The reason is that our society has broken away from the full truth about man, from the truth about what man and woman really are as persons. Thus it cannot adequately comprehend the real meaning of the gift of persons in marriage, responsible love at the service of fatherhood and motherhood, and the true grandeur of procreation and education.”

—–

7. Therefore, the educative work of parents is indispensable, for, “If it is true that by giving life parents share in God’s creative work, it is also true that by raising their children they become sharers in his paternal and at the same time maternal way of teaching…Through Christ all education, within the family and outside of it, becomes part of God’s own saving pedagogy, which is addressed to individuals and families and culminates in the Paschal Mystery of the Lord’s Death and Resurrection.” In their at times delicate and arduous task, parents must not let themselves become discouraged, rather, they should place their trust in the help of God the Creator and Christ the Redeemer. They should remember that the Church prays for them with the words that Pope Saint Clement I raised to the Lord for all who bear authority in his name: “Grant to them, Lord, health, peace, concord and stability, so that they may exercise without offence the sovereignty that you have given them. Master, heavenly King of the ages, you give glory, honor, and power over the things of the earth to the sons of men. Direct, Lord, their counsel, following what is pleasing and acceptable in your sight, so that by exercising with devotion and in peace and gentleness the power that you have given to them, they may find favor with you.” On the other hand, having given and welcomed life in an atmosphere of love, parents are rich in an educative potential which no one else possesses. In a unique way they know their own children; they know them in their unrepeatable identity and by experience they possess the secrets and the resources of true love.

—–

Catholic Family
12. The gift of God: this great truth and basic fact stands at the centre of the Christian conscience of parents and their children. Here we refer to the gift which God has given us in calling us to life, to exist as man or woman in an unrepeatable existence, full of endless possibilities for growing spiritually and morally: “human life is a gift received in order then to be given as a gift.”

“In fact the gift reveals, so to speak, a particular characteristic of human existence, or rather, of the very essence of the person. When God Yahweh says that ‘it is not good that man should be alone’ (Genesis 2:18), he affirms that ‘alone,’ man does not completely realize his existence. He realizes it only by existing ‘with some one’— and even more deeply and completely: by existing ‘for some one.’”

Married love is fulfilled in openness to the other person and in self-giving, taking the form of a total gift that belongs to this state of life. Moreover, the vocation to the consecrated life always finds its meaning in self-giving, sustained by a special grace, the gift of oneself “to God alone with an undivided heart in a remarkable manner” in order to serve him more fully in the Church. Therefore, in every condition and state of life, this gift comes to be ever more wondrous by redeeming grace, through which we become “partakers of the divine nature” (2 Peter 1:4) and are called to live the supernatural communion of love together with God and with our brothers and sisters. Even in the most delicate situations, Christian parents cannot forget that the gift of God is there, at the very basis of all personal and family history.

—–

13. “As an incarnate spirit, that is, a soul which expresses itself in a body and a body informed by an immortal spirit, man is called to love in his unified totality. Love includes the human body, and the body is made a sharer in spiritual love.” The meaning of sexuality itself is to be understood in the light of Christian Revelation: “Sexuality characterizes man and woman not only on the physical level, but also on the psychological and spiritual, making its mark on each of their expressions. Such diversity, linked to the complementarity of the two sexes, allows thorough response to the design of God according to the vocation to which each one is called.”

—–

19. When the family is providing real educational support and encouraging the exercise of all the virtues, education for chastity is made easy and lacks inner conflicts, even if at certain times young people can experience particularly delicate situations. For some who find themselves in situations where chastity is offended against and not valued, living in a chaste way can demand a hard or even a heroic struggle. Nonetheless, with the grace of Christ, flowing from his spousal love for the Church, everyone can live chastely even if they find themselves in unfavorable circumstances. The very fact that all are called to holiness, as the Second Vatican Council teaches, makes it easier to understand that everyone can be in situations where heroic acts of virtue are indispensable, whether in celibate life or marriage, and that in fact, in one way or another, this happens to everyone for shorter or longer periods of time. Therefore, married life also entails a joyous and demanding path to holiness.

—–

22. Educating children for chastity strives to achieve three objectives: (a) to maintain in the family a positive atmosphere of love, virtue and respect for the gifts of God, in particular the gift of life; (b) to helpFamily 3 children understand the value of sexuality and chastity in stages, sustaining their growth through enlightening word, example and prayer; (c) to help them understand and discover their own vocation to marriage or to consecrated virginity for the sake of the Kingdom of Heaven in harmony with and respecting their attitudes and inclinations and the gifts of the Spirit.

—–

23. Other educators can assist in this task, but they can only take the place of parents for serious reasons of physical or moral incapacity. On this point the Magisterium of the Church has expressed itself clearly, in relation to the whole educative process of children:

“The role of parents in education is of such importance that it is almost impossible to find an adequate substitute. It is therefore the duty of parents to create a family atmosphere inspired by love and devotion to God and their fellow-men, which will promote an integrated, personal and social education of their children. The family is therefore the principal school of the social virtues which are necessary to every society.”

In fact education is the parents’ domain insofar as their educational task continues the generation of life; moreover, it is an offering of their humanity to their children to which they are solemnly bound in the very moment of celebrating their marriage.

“Parents are the first and most important educators of their children, and they also possess a fundamental competency in this area: they are educators because they are parents. They share their individual mission with other individuals or institutions, such as the Church and the State. But the mission of education must always be carried out in accordance with a proper application of the principle of subsidiarity. This implies the legitimacy and indeed the need of giving assistance to the parents, but finds its intrinsic and absolute limit in their prevailing right and their actual capabilities. The principle of subsidiarity is thus at the service of parental love, meeting the good of the family unit. For parents by themselves are not capable of satisfying every requirement of the whole process of raising children, especially in matters concerning their schooling and the entire gamut of socialization. Subsidiarity thus complements paternal and maternal love and confirms its fundamental nature, inasmuch as all other participants in the process of education are only able to carry out their responsibilities in the name of the parents, with their consent and, to a certain degree, with their authorization.”

—–

26. The family carries out a decisive role in cultivating and developing all vocations, as the Second Vatican Council taught:

“From the marriage of Christians there comes the family in which new citizens of human society are born and, by the grace of the Holy Spirit in Baptism, those are made children of God so that the People of God may be perpetuated throughout the centuries. In what might be regarded as the domestic church, the parents, by word and example, are the first heralds of the faith with regard to their children. They must foster the vocation which is proper to each child, and this with special care if it be to religion.”

Yet the very fact that vocations flourish is the sign of adequate pastoral care of the family:

“Where there is an effective and enlightened family apostolate, just as it becomes normal to accept life as a gift from God, so it is easier for God’s voice to resound and to find a more generous hearing.”

Here we are dealing with vocations to marriage or to virginity or celibacy, but these are always vocations to holiness. Indeed, the document Lumen Gentium presents the Second Vatican Council’s teaching on the universal call to holiness:

“Strengthened by so many and such great means of salvation, all the faithful, whatever their condition or state — though each in his own way — are called by the Lord to that perfection of sanctity by which the Father himself is perfect.”

—–

Family 13

34. Christian revelation presents the two vocations to love: marriage and virginity. In some societies today, not only marriage and the family, but also vocations to the priesthood and the religious life, are often in a state of crisis. The two situations are inseparable:

“When marriage is not esteemed, neither can consecrated virginity or celibacy exist; when human sexuality is not regarded as a great value given by the Creator, the renunciation of it for the sake of the kingdom of heaven loses its meaning.”

A lack of vocations follows from the breakdown of the family, yet where parents are generous in welcoming life, children will be more likely to be generous when it comes to the question of offering themselves to God:

“Families must once again express a generous love for life and place themselves at its service above all by accepting the children which the Lord wants to give them with a sense of responsibility not detached from peaceful trust…”

…and they may bring this acceptance to fulfillment not only…

“…through a continuing educational effort but also through an obligatory commitment, at times perhaps neglected, to help teenagers especially and young people to accept the vocational dimension of every living being, within God’s plan… Human life acquires fullness when it becomes a self-gift: a gift which can express itself in matrimony, in consecrated virginity, in self-dedication to one’s neighbor towards an ideal, or in the choice of priestly ministry. Parents will truly serve the life of their children if they help them make their own lives a gift, respecting their mature choices and fostering joyfully each vocation, including the religious and priestly one.”

When he deals with sexual education in Familiaris Consortio, this is why Pope John Paul II affirms:

“Indeed Christian parents, discerning the signs of God’s call, will devote special attention and care to education in virginity or celibacy as the supreme form of that self-giving that constitutes the very meaning of human sexuality.”

—–
Family 5
35. Parents should therefore rejoice if they see in any of their children the signs of God’s call to the higher vocation of virginity or celibacy for the love of the Kingdom of Heaven. They should accordingly adapt formation for chaste love to the needs of those children, encouraging them on their own path up to the time of entering the seminary or house of formation, or until this specific call to self-giving with an undivided heart matures. They must respect and appreciate the freedom of each of their children, encouraging their personal vocation and without trying to impose a predetermined vocation on them. The Second Vatican Council clearly set out this distinct and honorable task of parents, who are supported in their work by teachers and priests:

“Parents should nurture and protect religious vocations in their children by educating them in Christian virtues.”

“The duty of fostering vocations falls on the whole Christian community….The greatest contribution is made by families which are animated by a spirit of faith, charity and piety and which provide, as it were, a first seminary, and by parishes in whose abundant life the young people themselves take an active part.” “Parents, teachers, and all who are in any way concerned in the education of boys and young men ought to train them in such a way that they will know the solicitude of the Lord for his flock and be alive to the needs of the Church. In this way they will be prepared when the Lord calls to answer generously with the prophet: ‘Here am I! Send me.’” (Isaiah 6:8).

This necessary family context for maturing religious and priestly vocations brings to mind the serious situation of many families, especially in certain countries, families with an impoverished life because they have chosen to deprive themselves of children or where they have only one child, a situation in which it is very difficult for vocations to arise and even difficult to develop a full social education.

—–

38. In the context of formation in chastity, “fatherhood-motherhood” also includes one parent who is left alone and adoptive parents. The task of a single parent is certainly not easy because the support of the other spouse and the role and example of a parent of the other sex is lacking. But God sustains single parents with a special love and calls them to take on this task with the same generosity and sensitivity with which they love and care for their children in other areas of family life.

—–

Family 9

41. Before going into the practical details of young people’s formation in chastity, it is extremely important for parents to be aware of their rights and duties, particularly in the face of a State or a school that tends to take up the initiative in the area of sex education. The Holy Father John Paul II reaffirms this in Familiaris Consortio:

“The right and duty of parents to give education is essential, since it is connected with the transmission of human life; it is original and primary with regard to the educational role of others, on account of the uniqueness of the loving relationship between parents and children; and it is irreplaceable and inalienable, and therefore incapable of being entirely delegated to others or usurped by others…”

…except in the case, as mentioned at the beginning, of physical or psychological impossibility.

—–

47. We cannot forget, however, that we are dealing with a right and duty to educate which, in the past, Christian parents carried out or exercised little. Perhaps this was because the problem was not as acute as it is today, or because the parents’ task was in part fulfilled by the strength of prevailing social models and the role played by the Church and the Catholic school in this area. It is not easy for parents to take on this educational commitment because today it appears to be rather complex, and greater than what the family could offer, also because, in most cases, it is not possible to refer to what one’s own parents did in this regard.

—–

48. The family environment is thus the normal and usual place for forming children and young people to consolidate and exercise the virtues of charity, temperance, fortitude and chastity. As the domestic church, the family is the school of the richest humanity. This is particularly true for the moral and spiritual education on such a delicate matter as chastity. Physical, psychological and spiritual aspects are involved in chastity, as well as the first signs of freedom, the influence of social models, natural modesty and strong tendencies inherent in a human being’s bodily nature. All of these aspects are connected to an awareness, albeit implicit, of the dignity of the human person, called to collaborate with God and, at the same time, marked by fragility. In a Christian home, parents have the strength to lead their children to a real Christian maturation of their personalities, according to the measure of Christ, in his Mystical Body, the Church. While the family is rich in these strengths, it also needs the support of the State and society, according to the principle of subsidiarity:

“It can happen…that when a family does decide to live up fully to its vocation, it finds itself without the necessary support from the State and without sufficient resources. It is urgent therefore to promote not only family policies, but also those social policies which have the family as their principle object, policies which assist the family by providing adequate resources and efficient means of support, both for bringing up children and for looking after the elderly….”

—–

Family 850. In their most recent findings, the psychological and pedagogical sciences come together with human experience in emphasizing the decisive importance of the affective atmosphere that reigns in the family for a harmonious and valid sexual education, especially during the first years of infancy and childhood, and perhaps also during the prenatal stage, because children’s deep emotional patterns are established in these phases. The importance of the couple’s balance, acceptance, and understanding is stressed. Furthermore, emphasis is placed on the value of a serene relationship between husband and wife, on the value of their positive presence (both father and mother) during these important years for the processes of identification, and on the value of a relationship of reassuring affection toward their children.

—–

51. Certain serious privations or imbalances between parents (for example, one or both parents’ absence from family life, a lack of interest in the children’s education or excessive severity) are factors that can cause emotional and affective disturbances in children. These factors can seriously upset their adolescence and sometimes mark them for life. Parents must find time to be with their children and take time to talk with them. As a gift and a commitment, children are their most important task, although seemingly not always a very profitable one. Children are more important than work, entertainment, and social position. In these conversations — more and more as the years pass — parents should learn how to listen carefully to their children, how to make the effort to understand them, and how to recognize the fragment of truth that may be present in some forms of rebellion. At the same time, parents will have to be able to help their children to channel their anxieties and aspirations correctly, and teach them to reflect on the reality of things and how to reason. This does not mean imposing a certain line of behavior, but rather showing both the supernatural and human motives that recommend such behavior. Parents will succeed better if they are able to dedicate time to their children and really place themselves at their level with love.

—–

52. The Christian family is capable of offering an atmosphere permeated with that love for God that makes an authentic reciprocal gift possible. Children who have this experience are better disposed to live according to those moral truths that they see practiced in their parents’ lives. They will have confidence in them and will learn about the love that overcomes fears — and nothing moves us to love more than knowing that we are loved. In this way, the bond of mutual love, to which parents bear witness before their children, will safeguard their affective serenity. This bond will refine the intellect, the will, and the emotions by rejecting everything that could degrade or devalue the gift of human sexuality. In a family where love reigns, this gift is always understood as part of the call to self-giving in love for God and for others.

“The family is the first and fundamental school of social living: as a community of love, it finds in self-giving the law that guides it and makes it grow. The self-giving that inspires the love of husband and wife for each other is the model and norm for the self-giving that must be practiced in the relationships between brothers and sisters and the different generations living together in the family. And the communion and sharing that are part of everyday life in the home at times of joy and at times of difficulty are the most concrete and effective pedagogy for the active, responsible and fruitful inclusion of the children in the wider horizon of society.”

—–

59. The good example and leadership of parents is essential in strengthening the formation of young people in chastity. A mother who values her maternal vocation and her place in the home greatly helps develop the qualities of femininity and motherhood in her daughters, and sets a clear, strong, and noble example of womanhood for her sons. A father, whose behavior is inspired by masculine dignity without “machismo,” will be an attractive model for his sons, and inspire respect, admiration and security in his daughters.

—–

60. This is also true for education in a spirit of sacrifice in families, subject more than ever today to the pressures of materialism and consumerism. Only in this way will children grow up…

Family 10
“…with a correct attitude of freedom with regard to material goods, by adopting a simple and austere lifestyle and being fully convinced that ‘man is more precious for what he is than for what he has.’ In a society shaken and split by tensions and conflicts caused by the violent clash of various kinds of individualism and selfishness, children must be enriched not only with a sense of true justice, which alone leads to respect for the personal dignity of each individual, but also and more powerfully by a sense of true love, understood as sincere solicitude and disinterested service with regard to others, especially the poorest and those in most need. This education is fully a part of the ‘civilization of love.’ It depends on the civilization of love and, in great measure, contributes to its upbuilding.”

—–

62. Lastly, we recall that in order to achieve these objectives, the family first of all should be a home of faith and prayer, in which God the Father’s presence is sensed, the Word of Jesus is accepted, the Spirit’s bond of love is felt, and where the most pure Mother of God is loved and invoked.

“This life of faith and family prayer has for its very own object family life itself, which in all its varying circumstances is seen as a call from God and lived as a filial response to his call. Joys and sorrows, hopes and disappointments, births and birthday celebrations, wedding anniversaries of the parents, departures, separations and homecomings, important and far-reaching decisions, the death of those who are dear, etc. — all of these mark God’s loving intervention in the family’s history. They should be seen as suitable moments for thanksgiving, for petition, for trusting abandonment of the family into the hands of their common Father in heaven.”

—–

63. In this atmosphere of prayer and awareness of the presence and fatherhood of God, the truths of faith and morals should be taught, understood, and deeply studied with reverence, and the Word of God should be read and lived with love. In this way Christ’s truth will build up a family community based on the example and guidance of parents who…

“…penetrate the innermost depths of their children’s hearts and leave an impression that the future events in their lives will not be able to efface.”

—–

65. Each child is a unique and unrepeatable person and must receive individualized formation. Since parents know, understand, and love each of their children in their uniqueness, they are in the best position to decide what the appropriate time is for providing a variety of information, according to their children’s physical and spiritual growth. No one can take this capacity for discernment away from conscientious parents.

—–

Family 7

66. Each child’s process of maturation as a person is different. Therefore, the most intimate aspects, whether biological or emotional, should be communicated in a personalized dialogue. In their dialogue with each child, with love and trust, parents communicate something about their own self-giving which makes them capable of giving witness to aspects of the emotional dimension of sexuality that could not be transmitted in other ways.

—–

68. The moral dimension must always be part of their explanations. Parents should stress that Christians are called to live the gift of sexuality according to the plan of God who is Love, i.e., in the context of marriage or of consecrated virginity and also celibacy. They must insist on the positive value of chastity and its capacity to generate true love for other persons. This is the most radical and important moral aspect of chastity. Only a person who knows how to be chaste will know how to love in marriage or in virginity.

—–

70. Formation in chastity and timely information regarding sexuality must be provided in the broadest context of education for love. It is not sufficient, therefore, to provide information about sex together with objective moral principles. Constant help is also required for the growth of children’s spiritual life, so that the biological development and impulses they begin to experience will always be accompanied by a growing love of God, the Creator and Redeemer, and an ever greater awareness of the dignity of each human person and his or her body. In the light of the mystery of Christ and the Church, parents can illustrate the positive values of human sexuality in the context of the person’s original vocation to love and the universal call to holiness.

—–
Family 14
73. The objective of the parents’ educational task is to pass on to their children the conviction that chastity in one’s state in life is possible and that chastity brings joy. Joy springs from an awareness of maturation and harmony in one’s emotional life, a gift of God, and a gift of love that makes self-giving possible in the framework of one’s vocation. Man is in fact the only creature on earth whom God wanted for its own sake, and…

“…man can fully discover his true self only in a sincere giving of himself.”

—–

98. In terms of personal development, adolescence represents the period of self-projection and therefore the discovery of one’s vocation. For physiological, social and cultural reasons, this period tends to be longer today than in the past. Christian parents should…

“…educate the children for life in such a way that each one may fully perform his or her role according to the vocation received from God.”

This is an extremely important task, which basically constitutes the culmination of the parents’ mission. Although this task is always important, it becomes especially so in this period of their children’s lives:

“Therefore, in the life of each member of the lay faithful there are particularly significant and decisive moments for discerning God’s call…Among these are the periods of adolescence and young adulthood.”

—–

99. It is very important for young people not to find themselves alone in discerning their personal vocation. Parental advice is relevant, at times decisive, as well as the support of a priest or other properly formed persons (in parishes, associations or in the new fruitful ecclesial movements, etc.) who are capable of helping them discover the vocational meaning of life and the various forms of the universal call to holiness.

“Christ’s ‘Follow me’ makes itself heard on the different paths taken by the disciples and confessors of the divine Redeemer.”

—–

Family 16

101. Therefore, in catechesis and the formation given both within and outside of the family, the Church’s teaching on the sublime value of virginity and celibacy must never be lacking, but also the vocational meaning of marriage, which a Christian can never regard as only a human venture. As St. Paul says,

“This is a great mystery, and I mean in reference to Christ and the church.” (Ephesians 5:32).

Giving young people this firm conviction is of supreme importance for the good both of the Church and humanity, which…

“…depend in great part on parents and on the family life that they build in their homes.’”

—–

102. Parents should always strive to give example and witness with their own lives to fidelity to God and one another in the marriage covenant. Their example is especially decisive in adolescence, the phase when young people are looking for lived and attractive behavior models. Since sexual problems become more evident at this time, parents should also help them to love the beauty and strength of chastity through prudent advice, highlighting the inestimable value of prayer and frequent fruitful recourse to the sacraments for a chaste life, especially personal confession.

—–

110. By keeping open a confident dialogue that encourages a sense of responsibility and respects their children’s legitimate and necessary autonomy, parents will always be their reference point, through both advice and example, so that the process of broader socialization will make it possible for them to achieve a mature and integrated personality, internally and socially. In a special way, care should be taken that children do not discontinue their faith relationship with the Church and her activities which, on the contrary, should be intensified. They should learn how to choose models of thought and life for their future and how to become committed in the cultural and social area as Christians, without fear of professing that they are Christians and without losing a sense of vocation and the search for their own vocation.

—–

Family 17

111. Parents should avoid adopting the widespread mentality whereby girls are given every recommendation regarding virtue and the value of virginity, while the same is not required for boys, as if everything were licit for them. For a Christian conscience and a vision of marriage and the family, St. Paul’s recommendation to the Philippians holds for every type of vocation:

 

“…whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things” (Philippians 4:8).

—–

112. In the context of education in the virtues, parents thus have the task of making themselves the promoters of their children’s authentic education for love. Through its very nature, the primary generation of a human life in the procreative act must be followed by the secondary generation, whereby parents help their child to develop his or her own personality.

—–

113. It is recommended that parents be aware of their own educational role and defend and carry out this primary right and duty. It follows that any educative activity, related to education for love and carried out by persons outside the family, must be subject to the parents’ acceptance of it and must be seen not as a substitute but as a support for their work. In fact,

“Sex education, which is a basic right and duty of parents, must always be carried out under their attentive guidance whether at home or in educational centers chosen and controlled by them.”

Frequently parents are not lacking in awareness and effort, but they are quite alone, defenseless and often made to feel they are wrong. They need understanding, but also support and help by groups, associations, and institutions.

—–

134. The religious formation of the parents themselves, in particular solid catechetical preparation of adults in the truth of love, builds the foundations of a mature faith that can guide them in the formation of their own children. This adult catechesis enables them not only to deepen their understanding of the community of life and love in marriage, but also helps them learn how to communicate better with their own children. Furthermore, in the very process of forming their children in love, parents will find that they benefit much, because they will discover that this ministry of love helps them to…

“…maintain a living awareness of the ‘gift’ they continually receive from their children.”

To make parents capable of carrying out their educational work, special formation courses with the help of experts can be promoted.

Family 15

—–

148. In fulfilling a ministry of love to their own children, parents should enjoy the support and cooperation of the other members of the Church. The rights of parents must be recognized, protected, and maintained, not only to ensure solid formation of children and young people, but also to guarantee the right order of cooperation and collaboration between parents and those who can help them in their task. Likewise, in parishes or apostolates, clergy and religious should support and encourage parents in striving to form their own children. In their turn, parents should remember that the family is not the only or exclusive formative community. Thus they should cultivate a cordial and active relationship with other persons who can help them, while never forgetting their own inalienable rights.

—–

149. In the face of many challenges to Christian chastity, the gifts of nature and grace which parents enjoy always remain the most solid foundations on which the Church forms her children. Much of the formation in the home is indirect, incarnated in a loving and tender atmosphere, for it arises from the presence and example of parents whose love is pure and generous. If parents are given confidence in this task of education for love, they will be inspired to overcome the challenges and problems of our times by their own ministry of love.

—–

Family 18
150. The Pontifical Council for the Family therefore urges parents to have confidence in their rights and duties regarding the education of their children, so as to go forward with wisdom and knowledge, knowing that they are sustained by God’s gift. In this noble task, may parents always place their trust in God through prayer to the Holy Spirit, the gentle Paraclete and Giver of all good gifts. May they seek the powerful intercession and protection of Mary Immaculate, the Virgin Mother of fair love and model of faithful purity. Let them also invoke Saint Joseph, her just and chaste spouse, following his example of fidelity and purity of heart. May parents constantly rely on the love which they offer to their own children, a love which “casts out fear,” which “bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things” (1 Corinthians 13:7). Such love is and must be aimed towards eternity, towards the unending happiness promised by Our Lord Jesus Christ to those who follow him:

“Blessed are the pure of heart, for they shall see God” (Matthew 5:8).

PONTIFICIO CONSEJO PARA LA FAMILIA SEXUALIDAD HUMANA: 
VERDAD Y SIGNIFICADO

—–

5. La formación a la castidad, en el cuadro de la educación del joven a la realización y al don de sí, implica la colaboración prioritaria de los padres también en la formación de otras virtudes como la templanza, la fortaleza, la prudencia. La castidad, como virtud, no subsiste sin la capacidad de renuncia, de sacrificio y de espera. Al dar la vida, los padres cooperan con el poder creador de Dios y reciben el don de una nueva responsabilidad: no sólo la de nutrir y satisfacer las necesidades materiales y culturales de sus hijos, sino, sobre todo, la de transmitirles la verdad de la fe hecha vida y educarlos en el amor de Dios y del prójimo. Esta es su primera obligación en el seno de la “iglesia doméstica.” La Iglesia siempre ha afirmado que los padres tienen el deber y el derecho de ser los primeros y principales educadores de sus hijos. Con palabras del Concilio Vaticano II, el Catecismo de la Iglesia Católica recuerda que “Los jóvenes deben ser instruidos adecuada y oportunamente sobre la dignidad, tareas y ejercicio del amor conyugal, sobre todo en el seno de la misma familia.”

—–

6. Las provocaciones, provenientes de la mentalidad y del ambiente, no deben desanimar a los padres. Por una parte, en efecto, es necesario recordar que los cristianos, desde la primera evangelización, han tenido que enfrentarse a retos similares del hedonismo materialista.

“Nuestra civilización, aún teniendo tantos aspectos positivos a nivel material y cultural, debería darse cuenta de que, desde diversos puntos de vista, es una civilización enferma, que produce profundas alteraciones en el hombre. ?Por qué sucede esto? La razón está en el hecho de que nuestra sociedad se ha alejado de la plena verdad sobre el hombre, de la verdad sobre lo que el hombre y la mujer son como personas. Por consiguiente, no sabe comprender adecuadamente lo que son verdaderamente la entrega de las personas en el matrimonio, el amor responsable al servicio de la paternidad y la maternidad, la auténtica grandeza de la generación y la educación.”

—–

7. Es por esto mismo indispensable la labor educativa de los padres, quienes “si en el dar la vida colaboran en la obra creadora de Dios, mediante la educación participan de su pedagogía paterna y materna a la vez … Por medio de Cristo toda educación, en familia y fuera de ella, se inserta en la dimensión salvífica de la pedagogía divina, que está dirigida a los hombres y a las familias, y que culmina en el misterio pascual de la muerte y resurrección del Señor.”

En el cumplimiento de su tarea, a veces delicada y ardua, los padres no deben desanimarse, sino confiar en el apoyo de Dios Creador y de Cristo Redentor, recordando que la Iglesia ora por ellos con las palabras que el Papa Clemente I dirigía al Señor por todos aquellos que ejercen la autoridad en su nombre: “Concédeles, Señor, la salud, la paz, la concordia, la estabilidad, para que ejerzan sin tropiezo la soberanía que tú les has entregado. Eres tú, Señor, rey celestial de los siglos, quien da a los hijos de los hombres gloria, honor y poder sobre las cosas de la tierra. Dirige, Señor, su consejo según lo que es bueno, según lo que es agradable a tus ojos, para que ejerciendo con piedad, en la paz y la mansedumbre, el poder que les has dado, te encuentren propicio.”

Además, los padres, habiendo donado y acogido la vida en un clima de amor, poseen un potencial educativo que ningún otro detenta: ellos conocen en manera única los propios hijos, en su irrepetible singularidad y, por experiencia, poseen los secretos y los recursos del amor verdadero.

—–

Catholic Family
12. En el centro de la conciencia cristiana de los padres y de los hijos, debe estar presente esta verdad y este hecho fundamental: el don de Dios. Se trata del don que Dios nos ha hecho llamándonos a la vida y a existir como hombre o mujer en una existencia irrepetible, cargada de inagotables posibilidades de desarrollo espiritual y moral: “la vida humana es un don recibido para ser a su vez dado.”

“El don revela, por decirlo así, una característica especial de la existencia personal, más aun, de la misma esencia de la persona. Cuando Yahvé Dios dice que ‘no es bueno que el hombre esté solo’ (Gn 2, 18), afirma que el hombre por sí ‘solo’ no realiza totalmente esta esencia. Solamente la realiza existiendo ‘con alguno,’ y más profunda y completamente, existiendo ‘para alguno.'”

En la apertura al otro y en el don de sí se realiza el amor conyugal en la forma de donación total propia de este estado. Y es siempre en el don de sí, sostenido por una gracia especial, donde adquiere significado la vocación a la vida consagrada, « manera eminente de dedicarse más fácilmente a Dios solo con corazón indiviso »21 para servirlo más plenamente en la Iglesia. En toda condición y estado de vida, de todos modos, este don se hace todavía más maravilloso por la gracia redentora, por la cual llegamos a ser « partícipes de la naturaleza divina » (2 Pe 1, 4) y somos llamados a vivir juntos la comunión sobrenatural de caridad con Dios y con los hermanos. Los padres cristianos, también en las situaciones más delicadas, no deben olvidar que, como fundamento de toda la historia personal y doméstica, está el don de Dios.

—–

13.“En cuanto espíritu encarnado, es decir, alma que se expresa en el cuerpo informado por un espíritu inmortal, el hombre está llamado al amor en esta su totalidad unificada. El amor abarca también el cuerpo humano y el cuerpo se hace partícipe del amor espiritual.” A la luz de la Revelación cristiana se lee el significado interpersonal de la misma sexualidad: “La sexualidad caracteriza al hombre y a la mujer no sólo en el plano físico, sino también en el psicológico y espiritual con su huella consiguiente en todas sus manifestaciones. Esta diversidad, unida a la complementariedad de los dos sexos, responde cumplidamente al diseño de Dios según la vocación a la cual cada uno ha sido llamado.”

—–

19. Cuando la familia ejerce una válida labor de apoyo educativo y estimula el ejercicio de las virtudes, se facilita la educación a la castidad y se eliminan conflictos interiores, aun cuando en ocasiones los jóvenes puedan pasar por situaciones particularmente delicadas. Para algunos, que se encuentran en ambientes donde se ofende y descredita la castidad, vivir de un modo casto puede exigir una lucha exigente y hasta heroica. De todas maneras, con la gracia de Cristo, que brota de su amor esponsal por la Iglesia, todos pueden vivir castamente aunque se encuentren en circunstancias poco favorables. El mismo hecho de que todos han sido llamados a la santidad, como recuerda el Concilio Vaticano II, facilita entender que, tanto en el celibato como en el matrimonio, pueden presentarse —incluso, de hecho ocurre a todos, de un modo o de otro, por períodos más o menos largos—, situaciones en las cuales son indispensables actos heroicos de virtud. También la vida matrimonial implica, por tanto, un camino gozoso y exigente de santidad.

—–

22. La educación de los hijos a la castidad mira a tres objetivos: a) conservar en la familia un clima positivo de amor, de virtud y de respeto a los dones de Dios, particularmente al don de la vida; b) ayudar gradualmente a los hijos a comprender el valor de la sexualidad y de la castidad y sostener su desarrollo con el consejo, el ejemplo y la oración; c) ayudarles a comprender y a descubrir la propia vocación al matrimonio o a la virginidad dedicada al Reino de los cielos en armonía y en el respeto de sus aptitudes, inclinaciones y dones del Espíritu.

—–

23. En esta tarea pueden recibir ayudas de otros educadores, pero no ser sustituidos salvo por graves razones de incapacidad física o moral. Sobre este punto el Magisterio de la Iglesia se ha expresado con claridad, en relación con todo el proceso educativo de los hijos:

“Este deber de la educación familiar (de los padres) es de tanta trascendencia, que, cuando falta, difícilmente puede suplirse. Es, pues, deber de los padres crear una ambiente de familia animado por el amor por la piedad hacia Dios y hacia los hombres, que favorezca la educación íntegra personal y social de los hijos. La familia es, por tanto, la primera escuela de las virtudes sociales, que todas las sociedades necesitan.”

La educación, en efecto, corresponde a los padres en cuanto que la misión educativa continúa la de la generación y es dádiva de su humanidad a la que se han comprometido solemnemente en el momento de la celebración de su matrimonio.

“Los padres son los primeros y principales educadores de sus hijos, y en este campo tienen una competencia fundamental: son educadores por ser padres. Comparten su misión educativa con otras personas e instituciones, como la Iglesia y el Estado; pero aplicando correctamente el principio de subsidiaridad. De ahí la legitimidad e incluso el deber de ayudar a los padres, pero a la vez el límite intrínseco y no rebasable del derecho prevalente y las posibilidades efectivas de los padres. El principio de subsidiaridad está, por tanto, al servicio del amor de los padres, favoreciendo el bien del núcleo familiar. En efecto, los padres no son capaces de satisfacer por sí solos todas las exigencias del proceso educativo, especialmente en lo que atañe a la instrucción y al amplio sector de la socialización. La subsidiaridad completa así el amor paterno y materno, ratificando su carácter fundamental, porque cualquier otro colaborador en el proceso educativo debe actuar en nombre de los padres, con su consenso y, en cierta medida, incluso por encargo suyo.”

—–

26. La familia tiene un papel decisivo en el nacer de las vocaciones y en su desarrollo, como enseña el Concilio Vaticano II:

“Del matrimonio procede la familia, en la que nacen nuevos ciudadanos de la sociedad humana, quienes, por la gracia del Espíritu Santo, quedan constituidos en el bautismo hijos de Dios. En esta especie de Iglesia doméstica los padres deben ser para sus hijos los primeros predicadores de la fe, mediante la palabra y el ejemplo, y deben fomentar la vocación propia de cada uno, pero con un cuidado especial la vocación sagrada.”

Más aún, el signo de una pastoral familiar adecuada es precisamente el hecho que florezcan las vocaciones:

“Donde existe una iluminada y eficaz pastoral de la familia, como es natural que se acoja con alegría la vida, así es más fácil que resuene en ella la voz de Dios, y sea más generosa la escucha que recibe.”

Ya se trate de vocaciones al matrimonio o a la virginidad y al celibato, son siempre vocaciones a la santidad. En efecto, el documento del Concilio Vaticano II Lumen gentium expone su enseñanza acerca de la llamada universal a la santidad:

“Todos los fieles, cristianos de cualquier condición y estado, fortalecidos con tantos y tan poderosos medios de salvación, son llamados por el Señor, cada uno por su camino, a la perfección de aquella santidad con la que es perfecto el mismo Padre.”

—–

34. La Revelación cristiana presenta dos vocaciones al amor: el matrimonio y la virginidad. No raramente, en algunas sociedades actuales están en crisis no sólo el matrimonio y la familia, sino también las vocaciones al sacerdocio y a la vida religiosa. Las dos situaciones son inseparables:

“Cuando no se estima el matrimonio, no puede existir tampoco la virginidad consagrada; cuando la sexualidad humana no se considera un valor donado por el Creador, pierde significado la renuncia por el Reino de los cielos.”

A la disgregación de la familia sigue la falta de vocaciones; por el contrario, donde los padres son generosos en acoger la vida, es más fácil que lo sean también los hijos cuando se trata de ofrecerla a Dios:

“Es necesario que las familias vuelvan a expresar el generoso amor por la vida y se pongan a su servicio, sobre todo acogiendo, con sentido de responsabilidad unido a una serena confianza, los hijos que el Señor quiera donar…”

…y lleven a feliz cumplimiento esta acogida no sólo…

“…con una continua acción educativa, sino también con el debido compromiso de ayudar, sobre todo, a los adolescentes y a los jóvenes, a descubrir la dimensión vocacional de cada existencia, dentro del plan de Dios… La vida humana adquiere plenitud cuando se hace don de sí: un don que puede expresarse en el matrimonio, en la virginidad consagrada, en la dedicación al prójimo por un ideal, en la elección del sacerdocio ministerial. Los padres servirán verdaderamente la vida de sus hijos si los ayudan a hacer de su propia existencia un don, respetando sus opciones maduras y promoviendo con alegría cada vocación, también la religiosa y sacerdotal.”

Por esta razón, el Papa Juan Pablo II, cuando trata el tema de la educación sexual en laFamiliaris consortio, afirma:

“Los padres cristianos reserven una atención y cuidado especial —discerniendo los signos de la llamada de Dios— a la educación para la virginidad como forma suprema del don de uno mismo que constituye el sentido mismo de la sexualidad humana.”

—–

Family 5
35. Los padres por ello deben alegrarse si ven en alguno de sus hijos los signos de la llamada de Dios a la más alta vocación de la virginidad o del celibato por amor del Reino de los cielos. Deberán entonces adaptar la formación al amor casto a las necesidades de estos hijos, animándolos en su propio camino hasta el momento del ingreso en el seminario o en la casa de formación, o también hasta la maduración de esta vocación específica al don de sí con un corazón indiviso. Ellos deberán respetar y valorar la libertad de cada uno de sus hijos, animando su vocación personal y sin pretender imponerles ninguna determinada vocación. El Concilio Vaticano II recuerda con claridad esta peculiar y honrosa tarea de los padres, apoyados en su obra por los maestros y por los sacerdotes:

“Los padres, por la cristiana educación de sus hijos, deben cultivar y proteger en sus corazones la vocación religiosa.”

“El deber de formar las vocaciones afecta a toda la comunidad cristiana … La mayor ayuda en este sentido la prestan, por un lado, aquellas familias que, animadas del espíritu de fe, caridad y piedad, son como un primer seminario, y, por otro, las parroquias, de cuya fecundidad de vida participan los propios adolescentes ». « Los padres y maestros y todos aquellos a quienes de cualquier modo incumbe la educación de niños y jóvenes, instrúyanlos de forma que, conociendo la solicitud del Señor por su grey y considerando las necesidades de la Iglesia, estén prontos a responder generosamente al llamamiento del Señor, diciendo con el profeta:Aquí estoy yo, envíame (Is 6, 8).”

Este contexto familiar necesario para la maduración de las vocaciones religiosas y sacerdotales, recuerda la grave situación de muchas familias, especialmente en ciertos países, que son pobres en el valor de la vida, porque carecen deliberadamente de hijos, o tienen un único hijo, donde es muy difícil que surjan vocaciones y también se lleve a cabo una plena educación social.

—–

38. En el contexto de la formación en la castidad, la « paternidad-maternidad » incluye evidentemente al padre que queda solo y también a los padres adoptivos. La tarea del progenitor que queda solo no es ciertamente fácil, pues le falta el apoyo del otro cónyuge, y con ello, la actividad y el ejemplo de un cónyuge de sexo diferente. Dios, sin embargo, sostiene a los padres solos con amor especial, llamándolos a afrontar esta tarea con igual generosidad y sensibilidad con que aman y cuidan a sus hijos en otros aspectos de la vida familiar.

—–

Family 9
41. Antes de entrar en los detalles prácticos de la formación de los jóvenes en la castidad, es de extrema importancia que los padres sean conscientes de sus derechos y deberes, en particular frente a un Estado y a una escuela que tienden a asumir la iniciativa en el campo de la educación sexual. En la Familiaris consortio, el Santo Padre Juan Pablo II lo reafirma:

“El derecho-deber educativo de los padres se califica como esencial, relacionado como está con la transmisión de la vida humana; como original y primario, respecto al deber educativo de los demás, por la unicidad de la relación de amor que subsiste entre padres e hijos; como insustituible e inalienable y que, por consiguiente, no debe ser ni totalmente delegado ni usurpado por otros…”

…salvo el caso, al cual se ha hecho referencia al inicio, de la imposibilidad física o psíquica.

—–

47. No podemos olvidar, de todas maneras, que se trata de un derecho-deber, el de educar en la sexualidad, que los padres cristianos en el pasado han advertido y ejercitado poco, posiblemente porque el problema no tenía la gravedad actual: o porque su tarea era en parte sustituida por la fuerza de los modelos sociales dominantes y, además, por la suplencia que en este campo ejercían la Iglesia y la escuela católica. No es fácil para los padres asumir este compromiso educativo, porque hoy se revela muy complejo, superior a las posibilidades de las familias, y porque en la mayoría de los casos no existe la experiencia de cuanto con ellos hicieron los propios padres.

—–

48. El ambiente de la familia es, pues, el lugar normal y originario para la formación de los niños y de los jóvenes en la consolidación y en el ejercicio de las virtudes de la caridad, de la templanza, de la fortaleza y, por tanto, de la castidad. Como iglesia doméstica, la familia es, en efecto, la escuela más rica en humanidad. Esto vale especialmente para la educación moral y espiritual, en particular sobre un punto tan delicado como la castidad: en ella, de hecho, confluyen aspectos físicos, psíquicos y espirituales, deseos de libertad e influjo de los modelos sociales, pudor natural y fuertes tendencias inscritas en el cuerpo humano; factores, todos estos, que se encuentran unidos a la conciencia aunque sea implícita de la dignidad de la persona humana, llamada a colaborar con Dios, y al mismo tiempo marcada por la fragilidad. En un hogar cristiano los padres tienen la fuerza para conducir a los hijos hacia una verdadera madurez cristiana de su personalidad, según la medida de Cristo, en el seno de su Cuerpo místico que es la Iglesia. La familia, aun poseyendo estas fuerzas, tiene necesidad de apoyo también por parte del Estado y de la sociedad, según el principio de subsidiaridad:

“Pero ocurre que cuando la familia decide realizar plenamente su vocación, se puede encontrar sin el apoyo necesario por parte del Estado, que no dispone de recursos suficientes. Es urgente entonces, promover iniciativas políticas no sólo en favor de la familia, sino también políticas sociales que tengan como objetivo principal a la familia misma, ayudándola mediante la asignación de recursos adecuados e instrumentos eficaces de ayuda, bien sea para la educación de los hijos, bien sea para la atención de los ancianos.”

—–

Family 850. Las ciencias psicológicas y pedagógicas, en sus más recientes conquistas, y la experiencia, concuerdan en destacar la importancia decisiva, en orden a una armónica y válida educación sexual, del clima afectivo que reina en la familia, especialmente en los primeros años de la infancia y de la adolescencia y tal vez también en la fase pre-natal, períodos en los cuales se instauran los dinamismos emocionales y profundos de los adolescentes. Se evidencia la importancia del equilibrio, de la aceptación y de la comprensión a nivel de la pareja. Se subraya además, el valor de la serenidad del encuentro relacional entre los esposos, de su presencia positiva —sea del padre sea de la madre— en los años importantes para el proceso de identificación, y de la relación de sereno afecto hacia los niños.

—–

51. Ciertas graves carencias o desequilibrios que existen entre los padres (por ejemplo, la ausencia de la vida familiar de uno o de ambos padres, el desinterés educativo o la severidad excesiva), son factores capaces de causar en los niños traumas emocionales y afectivos que pueden entorpecer gravemente su adolescencia y a veces marcarlos para toda la vida. Es necesario que los padres encuentren el tiempo para estar con los hijos y de dialogar con ellos. Los hijos, don y deber, son su tarea más importante, si bien aparentemente no siempre muy rentable: lo son más que el trabajo, más que el descanso, más que la posición social. En tales conversaciones —y de modo creciente con el pasar de los años— es necesario saberlos escuchar con atención, esforzarse por comprenderlos, saber reconocer la parte de verdad que puede haber en algunas formas de rebelión. Al mismo tiempo, los padres podrán ayudarlos a encauzar rectamente ansias y aspiraciones, enseñándoles a reflexionar sobre la realidad de las cosas y a razonar. No se trata de imponerles una determinada línea de conducta, sino de mostrarles los motivos, sobrenaturales y humanos, que la recomiendan. Lo lograrán mejor, si saben dedicar tiempo a sus hijos y ponerse verdaderamente a su nivel, con amor.

—–

52. La familia cristiana es capaz de ofrecer una atmósfera impregnada de aquel amor a Dios que hace posible el auténtico don recíproco. Los niños que lo perciben están más dispuestos a vivir según las verdades morales practicadas por sus padres. Tendrán confianza en ellos y aprenderán aquel amor —nada mueve tanto a amar cuanto el saberse amados— que vence el miedo. Así el vínculo de amor recíproco, que los hijos descubren en sus padres, será una protección segura de su serenidad afectiva. Tal vínculo afina la inteligencia, la voluntad y las emociones, rechazando todo cuanto pueda degradar o envilecer el don de la sexualidad humana que, en una familia en la cual reina el amor, es siempre entendida como parte de la llamada al don de sí en el amor a Dios y a los demás:

“La familia es la primera y fundamental escuela de socialidad; como comunidad de amor, encuentra en el don de sí misma la ley que la rige y hace crecer. El don de sí, que inspira el amor mutuo de los esposos, se pone como modelo y norma del don de sí que debe haber en las relaciones entre hermanos y hermanas, y entre las diversas generaciones que conviven en la familia. La comunión y la participación vivida cotidianamente en la casa, en los momentos de alegría y de dificultad, representa la pedagogía más concreta y eficaz para la inserción activa, responsable y fecunda de los hijos en el horizonte más amplio de la sociedad.”

—–

59. El buen ejemplo y el liderazgo de los padres es esencial para reforzar la formación de los jóvenes a la castidad. La madre que estima la vocación materna y su puesto en la casa, ayuda enormemente a desarrollar, en sus propias hijas, las cualidades de la feminidad y de la maternidad y pone ante los hijos varones un claro ejemplo, de mujer recia y noble. El padre que inspira su conducta en un estilo de dignidad varonil, sin machismos, será un modelo atrayente para sus hijos e inspirará respeto, admiración y seguridad en las hijas.

60. Lo mismo vale para la educación al espíritu de sacrificio en las familias sometidas, hoy más que nunca, a las presiones del materialismo y del consumismo. Sólo así, los hijos crecerán…

Family 10“…en una justa libertad ante los bienes materiales, adoptando un estilo de vida sencillo y austero, convencidos de que ‘el hombre vale más por lo que es que por lo que tiene.’ En una sociedad sacudida y disgregada por tensiones y conflictos por el choque violento entre los varios individualismos y egoísmos, los hijos han de enriquecerse no sólo con el sentido de la verdadera justicia, que conduce al respeto de la dignidad de toda persona, sino también y más aun con el sentido del verdadero amor, como solicitud sincera y servicio desinteresado hacia los demás, especialmente a los más pobres y necesitados. La educación se sitúa plenamente en el horizonte de la ‘civilización del amor.’ Depende de ella y, en gran medida, contribuye a construirla.”

—–

62. Finalmente, recordamos que, para lograr estas metas, la familia debe ser ante todo casa de fe y de oración en la que se percibe la presencia de Dios Padre, se acoge la Palabra de Jesús, se siente el vínculo de amor, don del Espíritu, y se ama y se invoca a la purísima Madre de Dios. Esta vida de fe y de oración…

“…tiene como contenido original la misma vida de familiaque en las diversas circunstancias es interpretada como vocación de Dios y actuada como respuesta filial a su llamada: alegrías y dolores, esperanzas y tristezas, nacimientos y cumpleaños, aniversarios de la boda de los padres, partidas, alejamientos y regresos, elecciones importantes y decisivas, muerte de personas queridas, etc., señalan la intervención del amor de Dios en la historia de la familia, como deben señalar también el momento favorable a la acción de gracias, para la petición al abandono confiado de la familia en el Padre común que está en los cielos.”

—–

63. En esta atmósfera de oración y de reconocimiento de la presencia y la paternidad de Dios, las verdades de la fe y de la moral serán enseñadas, comprendidas y asumidas con reverencia, y la palabra de Dios será leída y vivida con amor. Así la verdad de Cristo edificará una comunidad familiar fundada sobre el ejemplo y la guía de los padres que…

“…calan profundamente en el corazón de sus hijos, dejando huellas que los posteriores acontecimientos de la vida no lograrán borrar.”

—–

65. Todo niño es una persona única e irrepetible y debe recibir una formación individualizada. Puesto que los padres conocen, comprenden y aman a cada uno de sus hijos en su irrepetibilidad, cuentan con la mejor posición para decidir el momento oportuno de dar las distintas informaciones, según el respectivo crecimiento físico y espiritual. Nadie debe privar a los padres, conscientes de su misión, de esta capacidad de discernimiento.

—–
Family 7
66. El proceso de madurez de cada niño como persona es distinto, por lo cual los aspectos tanto biológicos como afectivos, que tocan más de cerca su intimidad, deben serles comunicados a través de un diálogo personalizado. En el diálogo con cada hijo, hecho con amor y con confianza, los padres comunican algo del propio don de sí, y están en condición de testimoniar aspectos de la dimensión afectiva de la sexualidad no transmisibles de otra manera.

—–

68. La dimensión moral debe formar parte siempre de las explicaciones. Los padres podrán poner de relieve que los cristianos están llamados a vivir el don de la sexualidad según el plan de Dios que es Amor, en el contexto del matrimonio o de la virginidad consagrada o también en el celibato. Se ha de insistir en el valor positivo de la castidad y en la capacidad de generar verdadero amor hacia las personas: este es su más radical e importante aspecto moral; sólo quien sabe ser casto, sabrá amar en el matrimonio o en la virginidad.

—–

70. La educación a la castidad y las oportunas informaciones sobre la sexualidad deben ser ofrecidas en el más amplio contexto de la educación al amor. No es suficiente comunicar informaciones sobre el sexo junto a principios morales objetivos. Es necesaria la constante ayuda para el crecimiento en la vida espiritual de los hijos, para que su desarrollo biológico y las pulsiones que comienzan a experimentar se encuentren siempre acompañadas por un creciente amor a Dios Creador y Redentor y por una siempre más grande conciencia de la dignidad de toda persona humana y de su cuerpo. A la luz del misterio de Cristo y de la Iglesia, los padres pueden ilustrar los valores positivos de la sexualidad humana en el contexto de la nativa vocación de la persona al amor y de la llamada universal a la santidad.

—–
Family 14
73. Uno de los objetivos de los padres en su labor educativa es transmitir a los hijos la convicción de que la castidad en el propio estado es posible y genera alegría. La alegría brota de la conciencia de una madurez y armonía de la propia vida afectiva, que, siendo don de Dios y don de amor, permite realizar el don de sí en el ámbito de la propia vocación. El hombre, en efecto, única criatura sobre la tierra querida por Dios por sí misma,

“…no puede encontrar su propia plenitud si no es en la entrega sincera de sí mismo a los demás.”

—–

98. La adolescencia representa, en el desarrollo del sujeto, el período de la proyección de sí, y por tanto, del descubrimiento de la propia vocación: dicho período tiende a ser hoy —tanto por razones fisiológicas como por motivos socio-culturales— más prolongado en el tiempo que en el pasado. Los padres cristianos deben…

“…formar a los hijos para la vida, de manera que cada uno cumpla en plenitud su cometido, de acuerdo con la vocación recibida de Dios.”

Se trata de un empeño de suma importancia, que constituye en definitiva la cumbre de su misión de padres. Si esto es siempre importante, lo es de manera particular en este período de la vida de los hijos:

“En la vida de cada fiel laico hay momentos particularmente significativos y decisivos para discernir la llamada de Dios … Entre ellos están los momentos de laadolescencia y de la juventud.”

—–

99. Es fundamental que los jóvenes no se encuentren solos a la hora de discernir su vocación personal. Son importantes, y a veces decisivos, el consejo de los padres y el apoyo de un sacerdote o de otras personas adecuadamente formadas —en las parroquias, en las asociaciones y en los nuevos y fecundos movimientos eclesiales, etc.— capaces de ayudarlos a descubrir el sentido vocacional de la existencia y las formas concretas de la llamada universal a la santidad, puesto que…

“…el sígueme de Cristo se puede escuchar a través de una diversidad de caminos, por medio de los cuales proceden los discípulos y testigos del Redentor.”

—–

Family 16
101. Es pues necesario que no falte nunca en la catequesis y en la formación impartida dentro y fuera de la familia, no sólo la enseñanza de la Iglesia sobre el valor eminente de la virginidad y del celibato, sino también sobre el sentido vocacional del matrimonio, que nunca debe ser considerado por un cristiano sólo como una aventura humana:

“Gran misterio es éste, lo digo respecto a Cristo y a la Iglesia…” dice san Pablo (Ef 5, 32).

Dar a los jóvenes esta firme convicción, trascendental para el bien de la Iglesia y de la humanidad…

“…depende en gran parte de los padres y de la vida familiar que construyen en la propia casa .”

—–

102. Los padres deben prepararse para dar, con la propia vida, el ejemplo y el testimonio de la fidelidad a Dios y de la fidelidad de uno al otro en la alianza conyugal. Su ejemplo es particularmente decisivo en la adolescencia, período en el cual los jóvenes buscan modelos de conducta reales y atrayentes. Como en este tiempo los problemas sexuales se tornan con frecuencia más evidentes, los padres han de ayudarles a amar la belleza y la fuerza de la castidad con consejos prudentes, poniendo en evidencia el valor inestimable que, para vivir esta virtud, poseen la oración y la recepción fructuosa de los sacramentos, especialmente la confesión personal.

—–

110. Los padres, manteniendo un diálogo confiado y capaz de promover el sentido de responsabilidad en el respeto de su legítima y necesaria autonomía, constituirán siempre un punto de referencia para los hijos, con el consejo y con el ejemplo, a fin de que el proceso de socialización les permita conseguir una personalidad madura y plena interior y socialmente. En modo particular, se deberá tener cuidado que los hijos no disminuyan, antes intensifiquen, la relación de fe con la Iglesia y con las actividades eclesiales; que sepan escoger maestros del saber y de la vida para su futuro; y que sean capaces de comprometerse en el campo cultural y social como cristianos, sin temor a profesarse como tales y sin perder el sentido y la búsqueda de la propia vocación.

—–

Family 17
111. Se deberá evitar la difusa mentalidad según la cual se deben hacer a las hijas todas las recomendaciones en tema de virtud y sobre el valor de la virginidad, mientras no sería necesario a los hijos, como si para ellos todo fuera lícito. Para una conciencia cristiana y para una visión del matrimonio y de la familia, y de cualquier vocación, conserva todo su vigor la recomendación de San Pablo a los Filipenses:

“Cuanto hay de verdadero, de noble, de justo, de puro, de amable, de honorable, todo cuanto sea virtud y cosa digna de elogio, todo eso ocupe nuestra atención” (Flp 4, 8).

—–

112. Es tarea de los padres ser promotores de una auténtica educación de sus hijos en el amor, en las virtudes: a la generación primera de una vida humana en el acto procreativo debe seguir, por su misma naturaleza, la generación segunda, que lleva a los padres a ayudar al hijo en el desarrollo de la propia personalidad.

—–

113. Se recomienda a los padres ser conscientes de su propio papel educativo y de defender y ejercitar este derecho-deber primario. De aquí se sigue que toda intervención educativa, relativa a la educación en el amor, por parte de personas extrañas a la familia, ha de estar subordinada a la aceptación por los padres y se ha de configurar no como una sustitución, sino como un apoyo a su actuación: en efecto…

“…la educación sexual, derecho y deber fundamental de los padres, debe realizarse siempre bajo su dirección solícita, tanto en casa como en los centros educativos elegidos y controlados por ellos .”

No falta frecuentemente ni el conocimiento ni el esfuerzo por parte de los padres. Sin embargo, a veces, se encuentran muy solos, indefensos y con frecuencia culpabilizados. Tienen necesidad no sólo de comprensión, sino también de apoyo y de ayuda por parte de grupos, asociaciones e instituciones.

—–

134. La formación religiosa de los mismos padres, en especial la sólida preparación catequética de los adultos en la verdad del amor, constituye la base de una fe madura que puede guiarlos en la formación de sus hijos. Tal catequesis permite no sólo profundizar en la comprensión de la comunidad de vida y de amor del matrimonio, sino aprender a comunicarse mejor con los propios hijos. Además, durante el proceso de esta formación en el amor de sus hijos, los padres obtendrán gran beneficio pues descubrirán que este ministerio de amor les ayuda a mantener…

” …viva conciencia del “don”, que continuamente reciben de los hijos.”

Para capacitar a los padres a llevar a cabo su tarea educativa, puede ser de interés promover cursos de formación especial con la colaboración de expertos.
Family 15

—–

148. En el cumplimiento de su ministerio de amor hacia los propios hijos, los padres deberían gozar del apoyo y la cooperación de los demás miembros de la Iglesia. Los derechos de los padres han de ser reconocidos, tutelados y mantenidos no sólo para asegurar la sólida formación de los niños y de los jóvenes, sino para garantizar el justo orden de cooperación y colaboración entre los padres y quienes pueden ayudarles en su tarea. Igualmente en las parroquias y otras formas de apostolado, el clero y los religiosos han de sostener y estimular a los padres en el esfuerzo por formar a los propios hijos. A su vez, los padres deben recordar que la familia no es la única o exclusiva comunidad formativa. Han de cultivar una relación cordial y activa con las personas que pueden ayudarles, sin olvidar nunca que sus propios derechos son inalienables.

—–

149. Frente a los grandes retos para la castidad cristiana, los dones de naturaleza y gracia otorgados a los padres constituyen las bases más sólidas sobre las que la Iglesia forma a sus propios hijos. Gran parte de la formación en familia es indirecta, encarnada en un clima de amabilidad y ternura, que surge de la presencia y del ejemplo de los padres cuando su amor es puro y generoso. Si se tiene confianza en los padres para esta tarea de educación en el amor, se sentirán estimulados a superar los retos y problemas de nuestro tiempo con la fuerza de su amor.

—–

Family 18
150. El Pontificio Consejo para la Familia exhorta por tanto a los padres para que, convencidos del apoyo de Dios, tengan confianza en sus derechos y en sus deberes en orden a la educación de sus hijos, y la lleven a cabo con sabiduría y responsabilidad. En este noble deber, los padres han de poner siempre su confianza en Dios a través de la invocación al Espíritu Santo, el dulce Paráclito, dador de todos los bienes. Pidan la potente intercesión y protección de María Inmaculada, Virgen Madre del amor hermoso y modelo de la pureza fiel. Invoquen a San José, su esposo justo y casto, siguiendo su ejemplo de fidelidad y pureza de corazón. Apóyense los padres constantemente en el amor que ofrecen a sus hijos, un amor que « elimina todo temor », que « todo lo excusa, todo lo cree, todo lo espera, todo lo soporta » (1 Cor 13, 7). Dicho amor tiende y ha de ser orientado a la eternidad, hacia la eterna felicidad prometida por nuestro Señor Jesucristo a quienes le siguen:

“Bienaventurados los puros de corazón, porque verán a Dios” (Mt 5, 8).

"For me, it is a great joy to be together with priests." -Pope Benedict XVI